About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 10
CSPAN 6
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 3
KGO (ABC) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and, of course, it is recognized. >> what's your view on spain? the country managed to avoid bailout so far, but will not meet its deficit target for the full year. do you think spain should be given more time? >> well, first of all, i think that, again, spain is going in the right direction. when you look at the current account, the deficit, you see that it had been diminished massively since the peak that they had in 2008, 2009. and, you know, as a very short summing up, it's been divided by more than five, though it's very, very encouraging. on the other hand, you have unit labor costs which have been diminishing quite a lot and the exports of spain are very dynamic today. so it also demonstrates that hard work is being done. it's difficult. it's tough, but going in the right direction. i trust that the global observers are observing progressively and the adjustment is proceed. in spain and in all the countries that are under adjustment. >> now, lonmin's ceo ian farmer is stepping down while being treated for a serious illness after being first admitted to hospital back in august.
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have the latest on not just the breakdown of this offer, but by the response of some key senators this morning. good morning. >> yeah, that's right, carl. we saw the offer come in late last night and now we'r
as governor. spain was he the head of the church at the time? >> absolutely. >> was their political insight within the church and did he have rifles? >> not really he felt that he didn't have any rivals within the church especially after they get to utah. there are other people that put themselves forward as possible leaders after joseph smith's death, but at the time brigham young's faction of the church reaches utah, he has eliminated most dissent. in fact she brags that the church does not experience 10% of the dissent under his leadership as it had under joseph but he had a firm hand. >> how many wives did he have? >> only 55. >> how many children? >> 58? wohlstetter does he have descendants today? >> tens of thousands. if they but all by the book i would be very wealthy. >> were you able to talk with any of his descendants and researching pioneer profit? >> i didn't set out to talk with any of his descendants but there are quite a number of brigham young's descendants in utah and i spent a lot of time in utah during research for the book so i happened to meet some of his descendants. >
than greece, more than spain. but conversely, china, if gdp is coming back, they are in what many consider to be a sweet spot. >> the numbers came out saturday for china. i think italy has been remarkably good. so this was a big game changer. italy had been a part of the good story of european recovery. now it's back. >> all to monti was never intended to be there for the long term. >> sure. >> in fact, he may be leaving a month earlier than originally planned. this should not be a surprise in the larger context. while we may mention berlusconi's name right now, he's not expected to win. >> look, we knew that monti was successful. >> it may be whoever follows him is going to roll some of the gains that he's had. so-called gains. >> that's going to cause ripples here. look, on saturday night, i said, we're going to have a nice opening. china's good, people know that monti is not really going to hurt italy. i think if china continues the momentum, but the number -- >> the ex sports were less than expected in the month of november. which is a concern. then there's this perverse glass
from spain. driving along. you see this. and wind starts to blow. oh, my gosh. >> wow. >> that's the type of the wind you're going to see in the northwest. >> that driver behind him is lucky. >> very lucky. >>> my "fixation" is my favorite this morning, because it comes from our dear friend robin roberts. she as jack russell terrier who she sent away temporarily while she's recovering from her transplant. the great friends another great dane. rory. well, she tweeted this picture yesterday because rory has made a new friend. they rescued another great dane. jojo and there you see kj in the middle. >> it doesn't even look real. >> all right, sticking with the animal theme, we have been teasing this all morning, this is an amazing cat, people are referring to it as a d.j. cat playing some bob marley here. scratching. moving on. keep it going. ke keep it going. it's actually a 6-month-old cat in ireland. >> that didn't work out well. >> i'm sensing that d.j. friday for that cat at "good morning america." >> are you sure about that? >> the viewers know, no cat was harmed in the maki
at the beauty pageant. they tonight want to put their money in greece, spain or portugal, so they're putting it here. our interest rates are so low. that's not going to last forever. be you go back up to a long-term average of 6-8%, we add a trillion dollars in debt service and cost interests over ten years. the interest alone will swallow up half of our federal expenditures. we'll be paying china for their military. we can't allow this to happen. and i think that's one of the reasons why we're so proud to do this book, is we really are putting policies in place and gentlemen, regardless of who's president in january 2013, they're going to face the exact same problems we have today. somebody has to tackle it, and part of what this action-oriented institute is doing, this book is doing is putting those ideas out there so we can start having a discussion about, one, the importance is real, we're here today, and here's how you get reform in place with pro-growth policies. we've talked about the idea of greece and their debt crisis, economic studies have looked back over history about when do co
way or the other, we will. >> remember when we used to talk about spain? italy? >> the good old days. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other bra
in the likes of portugal, ireland, some even to some degree in spain and greece. and that wouldn't have happened without the pressure in the markets. >> obviously. jim, we want to thank you very much for calling in on this new year's eve and wish you a happy 2013 to you, as well. >> happy new year's to you guys. good luck to you. >> things. >>> coming up, we're going to calm to some politicians and congress people. we have shelly moore-capito and congressman greg meeks of new york will join us on the show to talk about the biggest sticking points. at the top of the hour, vice chairman and republican policy committee chairman tom price will be our special guest. "squawk box" coming right back. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical
and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. -- a single currency. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, and to reach far too much into the future to bring value to the peasant and to re
and what's happening in britain and spain and elsewhere, they have embarked upon deficit reduction. and what that has done is contract their economies when they still have very high unemployment, very high under utilization of a lot of resources that. means that their ratio of their debts to their total economies keeps on getting worse. if you want that kind of economy, that kind of austerity economics, well then what you want to do is raise taxes on the middle class and also cut government spending. if you don't you don't go that way. and casey, with all due respect, there are three people looking for jobs for every job opening these days. i don't see how you can say that they're being paid for not getting jobs. >> casey, why don't we put some incentives into this economy? why don't we make it pay to work after taxes? why don't we make it pay more to invest after tax? while we're doing that, casey, why don't we shrink the size and scope of government so that the private sector can keep its own resources and spend up more wisely than the government will? >> well, you're asking me t
of a small town in spain christmas came a little early. they have won the bulk of the country's annual christmas lottery that pays out $2.2 billion. it usually goes thousands of winners. the biggest prize was won by residents of this town near madrid. spaniards usually buy tickets to share and share it amongst their friends and family so the joy is spread around. the so-called mayan end of the world prediction has come and gone. i think we're all still here, but tourists have good reason to get a taste of mayan history and culture in cheech knee za, mexico. nick parker gives us a look. >> i'm here in ancient mayan ruins of cheech i neat za where thousands came to mark the end of the world as some said. well, the world didn't end but there are still many, many good reasons to come and visit what has been described as one of the seven wonders of the modern world. chichen itza was one confident largest cities in the em buyer. it stretches out about five square kilometers of ground here in the yucatan. a lot of the architecture is still extremely imposing. it templeal corresponds to the ma
in southeast spain is cleaning up after revelers battled it out with flour, eggs, and -- wait for it -- firecrackers. the annual flour/egg/firecracker fight takes place on december 28 and celebrates spain's equivalent of april fool's day. to recap, that is flour, eggs, and firecrackers. jud . >> do they combine? >> yeah, like bisquick a la requirecrackers. >> some story meetings -- >> maybe next year. >> maybe. we'll see. >> thanks. >>> dylan dreyer has a check of the national forecast. good morning. >> good morning to you guys. yeah, talking about snow in the northeast. rain in the southeast. and right smack dab in the middle of the country, >>> snow will continue coming east. expect your snow chance prior to noon today. after that, it's rain. all the precipitation ending about 3:00 today. take a look because some folks are saying, where's the snow? it's west of us now between now and 9:00. that line will come to the east. we will be getting some snowfall in here, but only for about three or four hours. amounts pretty light. an inch, maybe just over that in montgomery county.
is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries that our welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employer's. -- employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unem
now. xetra dax up a quarter. cac 40 up around two thirds. ibex up half of 1% as well. spain have officially applied for bailout money. it is keeping yields well contained at the moment. 5.25%. a long way below that 6% level. italian yields also very well contained. lower today 4.41%. and the betting now is can spain keep from having to go for an official omt bailout to beyond the german elections which is scheduled september to october next year. so that's the game we play despite they have will have i issuance in 2013. gilt yields, chancellor statement coming out tomorrow. construction pmi today a little bit weaker. concerns over the uk economy. so we'll see how investors take to what's probably going to be a loosening up of the budget targets the chancellor set when they came into power. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and at the moment today, more talks in brussels. the greeks now getting their buy back program approved 37 trying to sort out a single supervisor. i think these talks will be fairly tricky because there is a majority who bt with a tant the be supervisor for all t
with the omp with spain but they gave you a second put which you guys didn't talk about which is amazing. >> what's the second piece of it then? >> the second piece was when they were just this last meeting and you had this vote, how did the vote go? you know how the vote went for lower interest rates? you guys know how -- can somebody put on their prompter so they can figure out what it is? how did the vote go for lower interest rates? i'll tell you how the vote went. lower interest rates. they didn't lower interest rates this time. what they said, though, if you go back and look at it, every member before voted for lower interest rates. majority for lower interest rates. who didn't vote for lower interest rates? it was azulman, if my pronunciation is wrong, there's no way i'm going to get it right. pittsburgh people, what are you going to do. and this other guy draghi. and there was a fourth guy, begins with a "c." basically you're in this situation, whenever draghi wants to lower interest rates in europe, he can do it. >> but we haven't understood why they haven't done it to this poin
, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raising of the debt ceiling be tied to these overall conversations or is that too dangerous? you talk about people shied away from your debt. caller: yes. you are going to have a tipping point that people are blind to. since 1847 with popular delusions and the madness of crowds when you get a contagion in there, you do not know what is going to be. people are going to run for the door. it is just stupid. they should have done the tax cuts first and then see if they need to raise taxes. the more sound policy is to cut some savings first to even see if we have to raise taxes. host: here is the statement put out by the white house yesterday. it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bell. bill. susan in pennsylvania, a democratic caller. welcome to the conversation. caller: what i am thinking is the
is going to lose. ♪ impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? >> >> brian: he dreamed of blowing up 10 synagogues in new york city. he will now spend 10 years behind bars and then deported. he got the sentence in exchange for pleading guilty. he could have gotten 32 years or if they asked me to be on the jury . it is that time of year again, the crib making its annual come back. of applause in the control room. it returns on decem
economies in the global economy. she was less bullish on the idea that greece or spain or anybody else in trouble might effect the u.s. economy. she said, you know, the problem with the u.s. is internal, and it becomes a world problem. >> what do you think about the supreme court, they're now going to consider california's proposition 8, consider same sex marriage in the united states. >> i think it raises obviously to the highest court in the land a question that has bounced around the states with different verdicts. you have had a lot of states had constitutional amendments banning same sex marriage, california said yes, then has said no. you had for the first time the past election a couple states pass it in a statewide referendum, when previously when it was on the ballot it had gone down. this is a question that has had different answers in some states, and some states different answers different times within the same state. the supreme court providing a road map is helpful, if you want a 50 state solution. the question is is that what the constitution calls for. >> and will they
on with the same-sex marriage, and scandinavia and holland and spain, the age of content -- consent is 12. do we want 12 year-old in some cases marion adults? host: we will leave it there. inauguration day is set for january. "the washington post" looks at funding. one more call from maine, this is michael on the republican line. caller: i wanted to bring to light that the separation of church and state is people bring up, it is far-fetched. the state of our country is wrapped up in everything we do. the constitution was set up to give guidelines for the with the country should be run. up until recent times of enter history, kids in school still did the pledge of allegiance, which we cannot do any more. it is not accepted. i think the federal court should tackle the gay rights issue. when you do this, you have a generational gap. there will be people growing up in households where they know nothing different from two moms or two that's it. it would just be normal. -- two das. it is not something i believe in. my wife believes in it. that is a touchy subject for us. they cannot produce children.
of questions. how does it apply to us. they're going through an awl lot in spain. it is a terrible economic situation. 50% unemployment for young people. 25% unemployment in the country. >> bill: wow. >> we think we got it bad. tricky stuff. >> bill: oh, boy. thanks for coming back from madrid just for -- >> just for the show. >> bill: for the "full court press" this morning. yesterday, we lost a real hero. a legendary united states senator in dan inouye died yesterday at the age of 88. he was known for many things. he had been representing hawaii. peter, as you know, since 1954. even before hawaii was a state. united states senator since 1963. and of course, a war hero. lost his right arm in combat in world war ii. was given the medal of honor by president clinton. >> which, by the way that's an amazing story about how he got that medal of honor and basically his hand, on a hand grenade. unbelievable. >> bill: he had one of the most distinctive speaking voices of any united states senator. here he is last yea
%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in boston that couldn't aafford to get their children he anything. this year for almost six decades help kamt no
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade, the 1970 's. we have seen that in other countries. raise the rates and you get less investment and a lower st
go with the resignation of mario monti. greece is higher. por sh gal is higher. spain is higher. it's a good day for -- investor sentiment.strongly it was revealed today. optimism over what the fed is going to do in the united states tomorrow. optimism there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff. you have optimism that the recapitalization of the banks is going to be delayed by another year according to the bank of italy. and you have optimism as well on mar of election promises as we now face the pros wekt of a much earlier election in italy. to that end it is fascinating. sylvia berlusconi has come out today warning about the germano center of politics. in other words, too much of a focus on what is happening from germany and the austerity inspired by angela merkel. in particular, he is drawing attention to this. which is the spread of the extra that investors demand to hold italian bonds over german bonds. i've shown this to you a couple times. over the last year it's been a mainstay of a lot of the italian business broadcasts internally. they say our bonds are currently trading so
of champagnes and other sparkling wines, this is from spain. sparkling wines, different places in the u.s. and in the country around the country, i have different sparkling wines. i have chandon, proseco from italy. >> juliet: with a little straw there. >> fun minis. >> juliet: for people who have no desire to make their own drinks. thank you very much. we'll get all this information out on our web site. >> cocktailguru.com. >> juliet: thank you so much. we're going to take a quick break. we'll be back in two minutes. stay with us [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. . . with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!
people of negative spirits from the previous year. >> all right. >> good one. >> spain, natalie, you know about this one. we're going to show it. >> we're going to demo. it sounds easy to eat 12 grapes. it is not easy. >> do we have the chimes? >> we're going to do it. so 30 seconds on the clock, please. >> this should go well. >> are we going to hear this? [ chiming ] >> you can't even get them in your mouth. oh, my -- good work. >> thank you. this is what happens when you've been pounding campaign all night. you can't deliver a grape into your mouth at close range. >> i'm dead sober. how do they do this drunk? >> you littered the floor with grapes. >> i'm sorry. >> they did those chimes too fast. >> those were very fast. >> that was very fun. >> you missed your mouth by half an inch. you couldn't make the transaction. amazing. >> how was your grape eating? >> you have to make one. yes! it's in there. >> i started laughing looking at everybody. >> it's fun. >> this is my new tradition. new underwear and grape eating. >> not for kids. >> exactly. >> now i have a little game for you guys.
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
[indiscernible] $750 billion came through and it was more aggressively priced than italy, spain, and portugal. that is where you create economic prosperity. the agencies are doing fantastic stuff but it will not create what we need on that continent. the marginal interventions are not going to create economic growth. we know how to create jobs, so instead of having large subsidy programs, start there. get rid of those programs and we can talk about economic growth. >> you can understand why they are the most prominent voices in the business. >> a look at social media and on line speech. this is half an hour. >> we are going to shift gears a bit. i took my tie off the war earlier this morning. first, there is wifi here. you should log on to the nyu guest account. user name is guest131. password is right there for you. we will talk about the use of social media. it has been on everyone's lips the last couple of years. we have wonderful guests that are known for their engagement with their audience. i predict we are going to hear a little bit of criticism and push back on some of the wisdom of s
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)